A little thought can make all the difference

Do You Take Protective Steps In The Office?

Today my friend Teresa posted the following on Twitter:

Accidents are never funny. And the picture of the broken chair can give you an idea of how serious this could have been.

I immediately tweeted her back asking why she didn’t routinely check her chair. “I need to do that?” she wondered.

I’ve worked around equipment my whole career, and it is easy to see how a lawn mower or a bulldozer can be dangerous, but you rarely think of office furniture as hazardous. Have you ever:

  1. Sat in a chair with a missing wheel?
  2. Rocked back in a four legged chair and balanced on the back two legs?
  3. Left a file or desk drawer open?

These are the obvious examples. Teresa found out that the failure was the screws stripped out of their plastic anchor points.

Anything with moving parts wears. Mostly, wear is a slow and nearly invisible process, almost like aging. But it happens. Anything that you use that has moving parts is worth inspecting once in a while.

So before you sit in that office chair next time, take a few seconds to make sure it’s safe. I’m pretty sure Teresa will.

 

 

 

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